Wednesday 17th January 2018

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Play It Again, Sam

January 7, 2018 Featured Today Comments Off on Play It Again, Sam

By DONALD DeMARCO Movie buffs know all too well that the words “Play it again, Sam” were never uttered in the film Casablanca. Ilsa, played by Ingrid Bergman, did say to the piano player (Dooley Wilson) “Play it,” but did not articulate the word “again.” Sam, however, did play the haunting song, As Time Goes By, again and again. Posterity has more than made up for that missing word. Woody Allen’s 1972 movie, Play It Again, Sam was based on his 1969 Broadway play by the same title. There is an international record label known as “Play It Again, Sam Records.” That persistent phrase also titles a 1989 work for solo viola by Milton Babbitt. It is a song and…Continue Reading

A Book Review… A Story Of Universal Truths For All Times

January 6, 2018 Featured Today Comments Off on A Book Review… A Story Of Universal Truths For All Times

By MITCHELL KALPAKGIAN The Time Before You Die: A Novel of the Reformation, by Lucy Beckett (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2016), 355 pp.; $16.95. Available from www.ignatius.com or call 1-800-651-1531. This moving historical novel with intense drama and great moral depth is based on the story of a Carthusian monk in Mount Grace Priory in York. He witnesses the turbulent, revolutionary changes of King Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monasteries, the schism of the Anglican Church’s separation from Rome, the terror of Queen Mary’s reign, and the birth of Lutheranism that divided England into Catholic and Protestant enemies. This riveting book views these cataclysmic events through the span of Robert Fletcher’s life from his entrance into the monastery to his…Continue Reading

Louisiana Issues Guidelines For Free Speech In Schools

January 5, 2018 Featured Today Comments Off on Louisiana Issues Guidelines For Free Speech In Schools

NEW ORLEANS — Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry and U.S. Cong. Mike Johnson released a 15-page document as a valuable resource regarding the religious and free speech rights of students in public schools, according to Liberty Counsel. The Louisiana Student Rights Review: Answers to Common Questions About Religious Freedom in Schools provides answers to 26 “frequently asked questions” regarding issues such as student-led prayer and when students can pray. The document also references cited court cases and Child Evangelism Fellowship’s Good News Clubs. Liberty Counsel represents Child Evangelism Fellowship nationally and has never lost a case at any court of final resort regarding the Good News Clubs. The released guidelines, which Cong. Johnson and Attorney General Landry plan on mailing…Continue Reading

Could Iranian Protests Bring Religious Freedom For Christians?

January 4, 2018 Featured Today Comments Off on Could Iranian Protests Bring Religious Freedom For Christians?

By MICHELLE LA ROSA TEHERAN (CNA/EWTN News) — Ongoing protests in Iran could be a sign of hope for repressed religious minorities, if protesters demand that conscience rights be respected, said an Iranian-born journalist who converted to Catholicism in 2016. Although most of those protesting in the streets of Iran were born after the 1979 revolution that led to the current Islamist regime, “many of them are chanting nostalgic slogans about the pre-revolutionary era,” noted Sohrab Ahmari. “At the time Iran was no democracy,” he said, but the pre-revolution regime “was far less repressive and people retained many personal and social liberties, if not political ones.” Ahmari was born in Teheran. He has lived in the United States for two…Continue Reading

Remembering Edith Hamilton

January 3, 2018 Featured Today Comments Off on Remembering Edith Hamilton

By JUDE P. DOUGHERTY The first edition of Edith Hamilton’s The Echo of Greece appeared in 1957, the same year in which she was made an honorary citizen of Athens, at age ninety. The book reflected a lifetime of study that had found its first expression in two works published as The Greek Way (1930) and The Roman Way (1932). Given the low estate of higher learning in the United States, these works, taken together, are perhaps more relevant today than when they were first published. The Greek Way began with these words: “When the world is storm driven and the bad that happens and the worst that threatens are so urgent as to shut out everything else from view,…Continue Reading

The Legacy Of The French Revolution . . . Rousseau’s General Will And The Reign Of Terror

January 2, 2018 Featured Today Comments Off on The Legacy Of The French Revolution . . . Rousseau’s General Will And The Reign Of Terror

By ALBERTO PIEDRA (Dr. Piedra is an emeritus professor at the Institute of World Politics.) + + + Now at the initial stages of the twenty-first century it seems appropriate to consider without passion and with greater objectivity the revolutionary phenomenon that shook Europe in the eighteenth century. Under the banner of “Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity,” traditional systems of government and social institutions were challenged and threatened with extinction. The first and foremost example is the case of France and the violent overthrow of the Bourbon dynasty. It is time for a reassessment of such events as the takeover of the Bastille and France’s Declaration of the Rights of Man in August 1789. They have been glorified to such an…Continue Reading

Also A Pro-Life Center’s 45th Anniversary . . . Bishop Begins A Weekend With Catholic Physicians

January 1, 2018 Featured Today Comments Off on Also A Pro-Life Center’s 45th Anniversary . . . Bishop Begins A Weekend With Catholic Physicians

By DEXTER DUGGAN PHOENIX — After his office day, Thomas Olmsted, bishop of the Diocese of Phoenix, came down to the first floor at diocesan headquarters here about 5:30 p.m. to hear individual Confessions by members of the Catholic Physicians Guild of Phoenix (CPG) in a conference room. These medical workers were holding an Advent Evening of Reflection on Friday, December 8, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, that began with private prayer at the diocesan center’s chapel, with Confessions down the hall for those desiring that sacrament. Like a physician’s, a bishop’s day may stretch into long hours. After speaking face-to-face with penitents, Olmsted crossed the downtown plaza separating the diocesan offices from nearby historic St. Mary’s Basilica, the…Continue Reading

The Limits Of Equality

December 31, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on The Limits Of Equality

By DONALD DeMARCO It should be sufficiently evident that not all human beings are equal in every way. Equality is a “Great Idea,” as philosopher Mortimer Adler notes, but it does not relate to every aspect of the human being. Nature has placed limits on it that cannot be denied without impunity. Human beings, as the Declaration of Independence states, are created equal. Consequent to this equality is equality under the law and other equalities that pertain to the dignity of man. People are equal in their humanity, but they differ markedly in natural endowment and in personal achievement. To stretch the notion of equality to the extent that it denies these two factors is unrealistic as well as unjust.…Continue Reading

Our Lady Of Fatima . . . The Last Vision And The Consecration Of Russia

December 30, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on Our Lady Of Fatima . . . The Last Vision And The Consecration Of Russia

By FR. SEAN CONNOLLY (Editor’s Note: This is the eleventh in a series of articles on the one hundredth anniversary of our Lady’s apparitions at Fatima. Fr. Connolly is a priest of the Archdiocese of New York. Part eleven is devoted to recounting the life of Lucia dos Santos; because of its length, it is appearing in two separate issues of The Wanderer. The first installment of part eleven ran in the December 14 issue.) + + + During the July 13, 1917 apparition, our Lady promised the conversion of Russia to avoid future wars, persecutions of the Church, and the spread of Communism, if two conditions were fulfilled — the devotion of the Five First Saturdays which we have…Continue Reading

The Anthropologist who Hated Relativism: A Tribute to my Father

December 29, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on The Anthropologist who Hated Relativism: A Tribute to my Father

By ARTHUR HIPPLER My father Arthur Edwin Hippler (1935-2017) is known to longtime readers of The Wanderer, for which he wrote during the late 80s and early 90s. At that point in his life he had time to write, because he had retired from his position as a professor of anthropology at the University of Alaska, where he had worked since 1968. My father was a graduate of the University of California Berkeley during the 1960s — with everything which that implies. He was a civil rights activist, a labor union organizer, and leader in a number of leftwing causes. When he moved to Alaska, he founded the state chapter American Civil Liberties Union, and become its first president. And…Continue Reading