Thursday 27th July 2017

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St. Teresa Of Calcutta… Hope For A Beleaguered World

June 26, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on St. Teresa Of Calcutta… Hope For A Beleaguered World

By DONALD DeMARCO “I feel the greatest destroyer of peace today is abortion, because it is a direct war, a direct killing, direct murder by the mother herself. And we read in the Scripture, for God says very clearly: Even if a mother could forget her child, I will not forget you. I have curved you in the palm of my hand. We are curved in the palm of His hand; so close to Him, that unborn child has been curved in the hand of God.” These words were spoken by Mother Teresa as part of her acceptance speech when she received the coveted Nobel Peace Prize (December 11, 1979). The words of a saint should not be taken lightly.…Continue Reading

Our Lady Of Fatima: The May Apparition

June 25, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on Our Lady Of Fatima: The May Apparition

By FR. SEAN CONNOLLY (Editor’s Note: This is the fourth in a series of articles on the one hundredth anniversary of Our Lady’s apparitions at Fatima. Fr. Connolly is a priest of the Archdiocese of New York.) + + + 1917 was a tumultuous year that would forever change the face of the world. The suicide of Christendom was taking place as the First World War was being waged throughout Europe, and Communist errors began to spread as the Bolshevik revolution took hold of Russia. Both of these events are at the root of the moral and social evils which characterize the present age. To the tiny and unknown Fatima, located in a country where an anticlerical government of prominent…Continue Reading

Atheist Christian Haters Win In Court

June 24, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on Atheist Christian Haters Win In Court

NEW YORK — Catholic League President Bill Donohue commented June 20 on a First Amendment case that dealt a blow to religious liberty. The full text follows: + + + For 75 years, Bayview Park, in a Pensacola, Fla., neighborhood, has been home to a large cross. The 1941 wooden cross, erected by a New Deal agency, was replaced by a civic group in 1969 with a 34-foot concrete “Latin cross.” No one complained until recently. On June 19, a federal judge ordered it to be taken down. U.S. District Judge Roger Vinson was sympathetic to the Christians who wanted the cross to stay, but felt he had no choice but to rule against them. “Thousands upon thousands,” he noted,…Continue Reading

A Long History Of Leftist Hatred

June 23, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on A Long History Of Leftist Hatred

By PATRICK J. BUCHANAN James T. Hodgkinson of Belleville, Ill., who aspired to end his life as a mass murderer of Republican congressmen, was a Donald Trump hater and a Bernie Sanders backer. Like many before him, Hodgkinson was a malevolent man of the hating and hard left. His planned atrocity failed because two Capitol Hill cops were at that Alexandria baseball field, providing security for House Whip Steve Scalise. Had those cops not been there, a massacre would have ensued with many more dead than the gunman. Recall. There were no armed citizens at that Tucson grocery in 2011, when six were murdered and Cong. Gabrielle Giffords was gravely wounded along with a dozen others. The nutcase doing the…Continue Reading

An Act Against Secular Leftism’s Top Dogma: Climate Change

June 22, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on An Act Against Secular Leftism’s Top Dogma: Climate Change

By SHAUN KENNEY (Editor’s Note: Shaun Kenney is a former executive director of American Life League, a former executive director of the Republican Party of Virginia, and an op-ed writer and ghostwriter for various publications and personalities in Washington, D.C.) + + + Finally, President Trump withdrew the United States of America from the Paris Climate Agreement, a handshake deal that his predecessor agreed to by fiat rather than sending it through the normal constitutional channels — namely, the United States Senate. The reaction from the political left in this country was abhorrent at best, like a child who just had his toys taken away and is in desperate need of a nap. At worst, it was the latest exhibition…Continue Reading

“Most Courageous” Parish Priest . . . Plans To Start Retired Life As “Hermit Monk” In Maui

June 21, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on “Most Courageous” Parish Priest . . . Plans To Start Retired Life As “Hermit Monk” In Maui

By DEXTER DUGGAN A veteran clergyman described by an admirer as “the most courageous priest in our San Diego Diocese” warned at his pre-retirement party that although the priority of Christianity is saving souls, he was hearing more from prelates concerned about earthly matters than religious ones. Fr. Richard Perozich, sometimes involved in news events reported in The Wanderer, gave a farewell talk in early June to about 30 members of Ecclesia Militans of San Diego, conservative lay Catholics for whom he served as spiritual adviser. Perozich’s final assignment as pastor, ending at the close of June, is at Immaculate Conception Church in San Diego’s historic Old Town, near where St. Junipero Serra offered his first Mass in California in…Continue Reading

A Book Review… There Are Limits To What Everyone Can Do, Even Those Who Stomp On Morality

June 20, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on A Book Review… There Are Limits To What Everyone Can Do, Even Those Who Stomp On Morality

By DEXTER DUGGAN The Virtues That Build Us Up: More Life Lessons From Great Literature, by Mitchell Kalpakgian, Crossroad Publishing Co., crosswordpublishing.com, New York, ISBN 978-0-8245-2075-5, 283 pages paperback; $19.95, 2016. In Rasselas, an allegory by 18th-century literary giant Samuel Johnson, a “projector” — a thinker who spins out theories — fantasizes that men can learn to fly like birds just as they can swim like fish. Of course, people can’t swim exactly like fish or as successfully, but at least they have the appendages to get about in the water that they lack for flight. Every fish navigates better without our long arms and legs, and not burdened with human lungs, but at least people can do a little…Continue Reading

Pope Francis On Medjugorje… Why The Visions Have Not Received Church Approval

June 19, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on Pope Francis On Medjugorje… Why The Visions Have Not Received Church Approval

By DONAL ANTHONY FOLEY Now that the dust has settled somewhat following the remarks made by Pope Francis about Medjugorje, on his journey back to Rome from Fatima in May — where he had just canonized Jacinta and Francisco Marto — we can see whether anything significant has occurred regarding the Vatican stance on Medjugorje. The Pope was asked what he thought about “shrines” like Medjugorje, and the religious fervor surrounding them. He responded by saying that presumed apparitions, such as Medjugorje, aren’t part of the public, ordinary Magisterium of the Church. Then he remarked that he was aware of problems concerning it, but that investigations were continuing and that he hoped that the truth about it would come out.…Continue Reading

William Kurelek… Painting For Life

June 18, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on William Kurelek… Painting For Life

By DONALD DeMARCO I was about to take my aesthetics students to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo when a friend suggested that on my way there, I stop at the Niagara Falls Art Gallery and view the artistry of William Kurelek. And so I did, but what we found there was an unexpected treasure. We never did get to Buffalo. The museum’s centerpiece is 160 paintings illustrating as many verses from the Passion of Christ according to St. Matthew. This ambitious project required six years of planning and execution, including a three-week sojourn in the Holy Land where Kurelek retraced the footsteps of Christ and three years in studying the Gospel. He commenced his work on New Year’s Day…Continue Reading

Writer Of Priests . . . The Vocation Of J.F. Powers

June 17, 2017 Featured Today Comments Off on Writer Of Priests . . . The Vocation Of J.F. Powers

By RAY CAVANAUGH Though he wasn’t a priest himself, J.F. Powers “seemed to have an interior knowledge of what it meant to be one in the United States,” wrote Mel Gussow for The New York Times. Through his fiction writing, Powers articulated the post-WWII priestly experience like no one else. This July 8 marks the 100th anniversary of his birth in Jacksonville, Ill. Of his early environment, Powers remarked: “The town was Protestant. The best people were Protestants and you felt that.” Powers was one of three children; his father worked as a manager for a dairy and poultry company. Young Powers had an all-American middle-class way of life, much of which revolved around the playing of baseball, basketball, and…Continue Reading