Monday 2nd March 2015

Home » Featured Today » Currently Reading:

Pope Francis’ Interview With Il Messaggero… Communism Stole Our Flag

July 11, 2014 Featured Today No Comments

ROME (ZENIT) — The following is ZENIT News Agency’s English translation of an interview Pope Francis gave to the Italian daily Il Messaggero, published on Monday, June 30. All rights reserved.

+    +    +

Interviewer Franca Giansoldati wrote, by way of an introduction: The appointment is at St. Martha’s in the afternoon. A speedy check, and a Swiss gentleman leads me to a small parlor.
There are six armchairs of somewhat worn-out green velvet, a small wooden table, one of those old televisions. Everything is in perfect order. The marble shines, some pictures. It could be a parish waiting room, one of those where one goes to ask for advice, or to fill in marriage documents.
Francis enters smiling: “Finally! I read you and now I finally meet you.” I blush. “Instead, I know you and now I listen to you.” He laughs. The Pope laughs heartily, as he will do at other times in the course of an hour-long off-the-cuff conversation.
Rome with its big-city evils, the era of change that weakens politics, the effort to defend the common good; the reappropriation by the Church of the issues of poverty and sharing (“Marx didn’t invent anything”), the dismay in face of the degradation of the peripheries of the soul, the slippery moral abyss in which children are abused, the tolerance of begging, the work of minors and, not least, the exploitation of child prostitutes not even 15 years old. And by clients who could be their grandfathers.
“Pedophiles” — this is how Pope describes them. Francis talks, explains, interrupts himself, returns to the subject — passion, gentleness, irony. A faint voice seems to lull the words. His hands accompany his way of reasoning, he clasps them, loosens them, they seem to trace invisible shapes in the air. And he is on excellent form, despite rumors about his health.
Q. It is now the Italy-Uruguay [soccer World Cup] game. Holy Father, whom are you rooting for?
A. Oh me, for no one, truly. I promised the president of Brazil (Dilma Rousseff) I would stay neutral.
Q. Shall we begin with Rome?
A. But you’re aware that I don’t know Rome? Just consider that I saw the Sistine Chapel for the first time when I took part in the conclave that elected Benedict XVI (in 2005). I haven’t even been to the museums. The fact is that, as a cardinal, I didn’t come here often. I know St. Mary Major because I always went there. And then St. Lawrence Outside-the-Walls where I went for Confirmations when Don Giacomo Tantardini was there. Obviously I know Piazza Navona because I always lodged on Via della Scrofa, behind there.
Q. Is there something Roman in Argentine Bergoglio?
A. Hardly anything at all. I am more Piedmontese; those are the original roots of my family. However, I’m beginning to feel Roman. I intend to visit the area, the parishes. I’m discovering this city little by little. It’s a most beautiful metropolis, unique, with the problems of large cities. A small city has an almost univocal structure; a metropolis, instead, includes seven or eight imaginary cities that overlap on various levels — also cultural levels.
I am thinking, for instance, of the urban tribes of young people. It’s like this in all big cities. In November, in fact, we will hold a congress at Barcelona dedicated to the pastoral care of metropolises.
In Argentina, exchanges were promoted with Mexico. One discovers so many intersecting cultures, but not so much because of migration, but rather because of transversal cultural territories, each having their own membership. The Church must be able to respond also to this phenomenon.
Q. Why, since the beginning, have you wished to stress so much the role of the Bishop of Rome?
A. Francis’ first service is this: to be the Bishop of Rome. He has all the Pope’s titles, universal Shepherd, Vicar of Christ, etc., in fact, because he is Bishop of Rome. It’s the first choice, the consequence of Peter’s primacy. If tomorrow the Pope wished to be the bishop of Tivoli, clearly they would throw me out.
Q. Forty years ago, under Paul VI, the Vicariate promoted a congress on the evils of Rome. A picture emerged of a city in which one whoever had much, had the best, and whoever had little, had the worst. In your opinion, what are the evils today of this city?
A. They are those of metropolises, as Buenos Aires. One who increases his profits, and one who is always poorer. I didn’t know about the congress on the evils of Rome. They are very Roman questions and, at the time, I was 38 years old. I am the first Pope who didn’t take part in the [Second Vatican] Council and the first who studied theology after the council and, at that time, for us the great light was Paul VI. For me, Evangelii Nuntiandi remains a document that has never been surpassed.
Q. Is there a hierarchy of values to be respected in the management of public affairs?
A. Certainly, to always protect the common good. This is the vocation of every politician. It is an ample concept that includes, for instance, the protection of human life, of its dignity. Paul VI used to say that the mission of politics is one of the highest forms of charity. Today, the problem of politics — I don’t speak only of Italy but of all countries, the problem is worldwide — is that it has been devalued, ruined by corruption, by the phenomenon of bribery.
A document published by the French bishops 15 years ago comes to mind. It was a pastoral letter entitled: Rehabilitating Politics, and it precisely addressed this question. If service isn’t the foundation, it’s not even possible to understand what politics is.

Moral And Material Poverty

Q. You have said that corruption smells rotten. You have also said that social corruption is the fruit of a sick heart and not merely external conditions. Without corrupt hearts, there would be no corruption. The corrupt person does not have friends but useful idiots. Can you explain this better?
A. I have spoken about the matter on two consecutive days because I was commenting on the reading about Naboth’s vineyard. I like to talk about the [Mass] readings of the day. The first day I addressed the phenomenology of corruption, the second day the way that the corrupt end up. In any case, the corrupt person has no friends, but only accomplices.
Q. In your opinion, is there so much talk about corruption because the mass media insist too much on the matter, or because it is in fact an endemic and a grave evil?
A. No, unfortunately, it is a worldwide phenomenon. There are heads of state in prison in fact for this. I have wondered about it a lot, and I have come to the conclusion that so many evils grow especially during epochal changes. We are living not so much an age of changes, but a change of age. Therefore, it is about a change of culture; precisely in this phase things of this sort emerge. A change of age fuels moral decadence, not only in politics, but in financial and social life.
Q. Even Christians don’t seem to give a shining witness….
A. It is the environment which facilitates corruption. I’m not saying that all are corrupt, but I think it’s difficult to remain honest in politics. I’m speaking about everywhere, not just Italy. I’m also thinking of other cases. Sometimes there are people who want to clear things up, but then they run into difficulty and it’s as if they’d been swallowed up by a multi-level, across the board, endemic phenomenon.
Not because it’s the nature of politics, but because when times are changing the push toward a certain moral drift becomes stronger.
Q. Are you more alarmed by the moral or material poverty of a city?
A. I am alarmed by both. For instance, I can help a hungry person so that he is no longer hungry. But if he has lost his job and doesn’t find employment, he has to deal with another poverty. He no longer has dignity. Perhaps he can go to Caritas and take home a food parcel, but he feels a very grave poverty that ruins his heart.
An auxiliary bishop of Rome told me that many persons go to the cafeteria, secretly and full of shame, and take some of the food home. Their dignity is progressively impoverished, they live without hope.
Q. On the streets of Rome you can see girls as young as 14 often forced into prostitution amid general neglect, while in the subway you see children begging. Is the Church still a leaven? Do you feel powerless as a bishop in the face of this moral decline?
A. I feel grief, I feel enormous pain. The exploitation of children makes me suffer. It’s the same thing in Argentina. Children are used for some manual labor because they have smaller hands. However, children are also exploited sexually, in hotels. Once I was alerted that on a street of Buenos Aires there were child prostitutes only 12 years old. I checked and it was in fact so. It made me sick.
But even more so to see high-powered cars stop, driven by elderly men. They could be their grandfathers. They would make the girl get in and paid her 15 pesos that were then used to buy discarded drugs, the “paco.” For me, these persons who do this to girls are pedophiles.
It also happens in Rome. The Eternal City, which should be a beacon to the world, is a mirror reflecting the moral decay of society. I think they are problems that can be resolved with a good social policy.
Q. What can politics do?
A. Respond in a clear way, for instance, with social services that help families to understand, supporting them to come out of burdensome situations. The phenomenon indicates a deficiency of social service in the society.
Q. The Church, however, is working so much. . . .
A. And she must continue to do so. Families in difficulty must be helped, uphill work that requires a common effort.

Go To The Fringes

Q. Increasingly in Rome, young people don’t go to church, don’t baptize their children, can’t even make the Sign of the Cross. What strategy would be useful to reverse this trend?
A. The Church must go out into the streets, seek the people, go to homes, visit families, go to the fringes. She must not be a Church which receives only, but which offers. . . .
Q. And parish priests shouldn’t put curlers on their sheep. . . .
A. [Laughs.] Obviously, we have been in a time of mission for some ten years. We must insist.
Q. Are you worried about the declining birthrate in Italy?
A. I think more work must be done for the common good of children. To put the family at the top is a commitment; sometimes the salary isn’t enough to make it to the end of the month. There is fear of losing one’s work and of no longer being able to pay the rent. Social politics doesn’t help. Italy has a very low birthrate, Spain is the same. France is doing a bit better but it is also low there.
It’s as if Europe was tired of being a mother, preferring to be a grandmother. Much depends on the economic crisis and not only on a cultural drift marked by selfishness and hedonism. I read a statistic the other day on the spending criteria of populations worldwide. After food, clothing, and medicine, three necessary items, come cosmetics and spending for pets.
Q. Animals count more than children?
A. It’s another phenomenon of cultural degradation. And this because the emotional relationship with animals is easier, can largely be programmed. An animal isn’t free, whereas to have a child is something complex.

Poverty Of The Spirit

Q. Does the Gospel speak more to the poor or to the rich to convert them?
A. Poverty is the center of the Gospel. The Gospel cannot be understood without understanding real poverty, keeping in mind that there is a most beautiful poverty of the spirit: to be poor before God so that God can fill you. The Gospel addresses the poor and the rich alike. And it speaks both of poverty and of wealth. It does not, in fact, condemn the rich at all, except when riches become the idolatrous objects — the god of money, the golden calf.
Q. You are regarded as a Communist, pauperist, populist Pope. The Economist, which has dedicated a cover to you, stated that you speak like Lenin. Do you identify yourself in this depiction?
A. I say only that the Communists have stolen the flag. The flag of the poor is Christian. Poverty is at the center of the Gospel. The poor are at the center of the Gospel. Let’s take Matthew 25, the protocol on which we will be judged: I was hungry, I was thirsty, I was in prison; I was sick, naked.
Or, let us look at the Beatitudes, another flag. The Communists say that all this is Communist. Yes, right, 20 centuries later. Now when they speak one could say to them: But you are Christians [laughs].
Q. If you allow me a criticism. . . .
A. Of course.
Q. Perhaps you speak little of women, and when you do, you address the argument only from the point of view of maternity, the woman spouse, the woman mother, etc. And yet now women lead states, multinationals, armies. In your opinion, what position do women occupy in the Church?
A. Women are the most beautiful thing God has made. The Church is woman. Church is a feminine word. Theology can’t be made without this feminine dimension. You are right about this, we don’t speak enough about it. I agree that more work must be done on the theology of woman. I have said so and work is being done in this regard.
Q. Do you perceive a certain underlying misogyny?
A. The fact is that woman was taken from a rib…[he laughs heartily]. It’s a joke, I’m joking. I agree that there must be more reflection on the feminine question, otherwise the Church herself cannot be understood.
Q. Can we expect historic decisions from you, such as a woman head of a dicastery, I don’t say of the clergy. . . .
A. [Laughs.] Well, so many times priests end up under the authority of their housekeepers. . . .

The Laity In Korea

Q. In August, you will go to Korea. Is it the door to China? Are you pointing to Asia?
A. I will go to Asia twice in six months: to Korea in August to meet Asian young people and, in January to Sri Lanka and the Philippines. The Church in Asia holds great promise.
Korea represents so much; it has behind it a most beautiful history. For two centuries it had no priests and Catholicism progressed thanks to the laity. There were also martyrs. In regard to China, it is a great cultural challenge, very great. And then there is the example of Matteo Ricci, who did so much good. . . .
Q. Where is Bergoglio’s Church heading?
A. Thank God I have no Church; I follow Christ. I didn’t found anything. From the point of view of style, I haven’t changed from the way I was at Buenos Aires. Yes, perhaps some little thing, because one must, but to change at my age would be ridiculous.
In regard to the plan, instead, I follow what the cardinals have requested during the general congregations before the conclave. I go in that direction. The Council of Eight Cardinals, an external body, was born from that. It was requested to help reform the Curia. Something, moreover, that isn’t easy because a step is taken, but then it emerges that this or that must be done, and if before there was one dicastery, it then becomes four. My decisions are the fruit of the pre-conclave meetings. I haven’t done anything on my own.
Q. A democratic approach?
A. They were decisions of the cardinals. I don’t know it it’s a democratic approach. I would say it is more synodal, even if the word is not appropriate for cardinals.
Q. What do you wish for Romans on the feast of their Patron Saints Peter and Paul?
A. That they continue to be good. They are very affectionate. I see it in the audiences and when I go to the parishes. I hope they won’t lose their joy, hope, and trust despite the difficulties. The romanaccio [Roman dialect] is also beautiful.
Q. Wojtyla learned to say volemose bene, damose da fa’ [Roman dialect phrases meaning “Let’s love another, let’s get to work!”]. Have you learned any sayings of you own?
A. For now little. Campa e fa’ campa [live and let live]. [Naturally, he laughs.]

Share Button

Comment on this Article:

Hit job on Card. Pell because he’s doing his job

His Eminence George Card Pell was appointed by Pope Francis to oversee cleaning up the finances of the Holy See. He is doing his job. And so as Pell drills into the financial corruption and is getting closer to the…Continue Reading

Oil company hit man has Archbishop Cordileone in his sights

San Francisco, Calif., Feb 27, 2015 / 05:20 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Sam Singer’s public relations firm spun a Chevron oil refinery disaster in California and fought back a legal ruling in Ecuador that could have awarded billions of dollars to…Continue Reading

What about Henry VIII?

Interestingly, Jesus’ hard teaching that “what therefore God has joined together, let no man put asunder” (Mt 19:6) follows not long after his insistence to Peter on the necessity of forgiveness (see Mt 18:21–35). It is true that Jesus did…Continue Reading

Sacrificing Priests on the Altar of Insurance

Fr. Bob (that’s what we’ll call him) was a faithful parish priest for more than 25 years. One day, a process server showed up at the rectory door and handed him a summons and complaint. The complaint alleged that some…Continue Reading

Catholic Colleges Must Save Students from Pornography Epidemic, Says Counseling Expert

Catholic colleges and universities owe it to their students to do everything within their power to help combat the destructive effects of pornography, argued Dr. Peter Kleponis in a recent interview with The Cardinal Newman Society. Kleponis, a licensed clinical…Continue Reading

Imagine: A Catholic Archbishop!

If it weren’t so predictable, it would be infuriating, but because of that, it is infuriating to thinking people. It’s happening again as San Francisco drops the hammer – again – on the Catholic Church and especially Archbishop Cordileone. He’s…Continue Reading

As storm brews, San Fran archbishop strikes back at school guideline critics

San Francisco, Calif., Feb 20, 2015 / 03:19 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Politicians have targeted San Francisco Catholic schools’ teacher standards, but Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone says they are a matter of Catholic mission and common sense. “Would you hire a campaign…Continue Reading

University of Scranton to end all abortion coverage

SCRANTON, Pa. (AP) – The University of Scranton plans to end employee health care coverage for abortions in cases of rape, incest and to preserve the life of the mother. The Times-Tribune of Scranton (http://bit.ly/1JstU9i ) reports Thursday that the…Continue Reading

Notre Dame Scandals under Fr. Jenkins Are Rooted in Diminished Catholic Faculty, Alumni Say

February 20, 2015, at 11:02 AM  |  By Kimberly Scharfenberger  | Following the election of University of Notre Dame President Father John Jenkins, C.S.C. to his third term, Notre Dame alumni spoke with The Cardinal Newman Society to share their…Continue Reading

Cardinal Napier: African Bishops Have Higher Priorities Than Communion for Divorced and Remarried

by CNA/EWTN NEWS 02/19/2015 Cardinal Wilfrid Napier speaks at the Vatican Press Office on Oct. 14, 2014. – Bohumil Petrik/CNA ROME — A leading African cardinal says the continent’s bishops want the upcoming Vatican synod to zero in on strengthening…Continue Reading

LGBT Catholic group gets special seating during Pope’s weekly address

(CNN)Members of New Ways Ministry — an advocacy group for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Catholics — have made three pilgrimages to the Vatican, under three different popes. But only once have they been treated like VIPs. That’s the treatment…Continue Reading

Cardinal Wuerl attacks “brother bishops” as “dissenters”

It is an open secret in Washington, D.C., that Donald Cardinal Wuerl has effectively banned Raymond Cardinal Burke from entering the Archdiocese of Washington.  Several sources have confirmed this to Rorate over the years, stemming from Wuerl’s disdain for any priest…Continue Reading

Untitled 5 Untitled 2

Attention Readers:

  Welcome to our new website. Readers who are familiar with The Wanderer know we have been providing Catholic news and orthodox commentary for over 145 years in our weekly print edition. Now we are introducing the online daily version of our print journal.


  Our daily version offers only some of what we publish weekly in print. To take advantage of everything The Wanderer publishes, we encourage you to subscribe to our flagship weekly print edition, which is mailed every Friday or, if you want to view it in its entirety online, you can subscribe to the E-edition, which is a replica of the print edition.
 
  Our daily edition includes: a selection of material from recent issues of our print edition, news stories updated daily from renowned news sources, access to archives from The Wanderer from the past 10 years, available at a minimum charge (this will be expanded as time goes on). Also: regularly updated features where we go back in time and highlight various columns and news items covered in The Wanderer over the past 145 years. And: a comments section in which your remarks are encouraged, both good and bad, including suggestions.

 
  We encourage you to become a daily visitor to our site. If you appreciate our site, tell your friends. As Catholics we must band together to rediscover our faith and share it with the world if we are to effectively counter a society whose moral culture seems to have no boundaries and a government whose rapidly extending reach threatens to extinguish the rights of people of faith to practice their religion (witness the HHS mandate). Now more than ever, vehicles like The Wanderer are needed for clarification and guidance on the issues of the day.

Catholic, conservative, orthodox, and loyal to the Magisterium have been this journal’s hallmarks for five generations. God willing, our message will continue well into this century and beyond.

Joseph Matt
President, The Wanderer Printing Co.

Untitled 1

A Powerful Weapon: 15 Quotes on the Holy Rosary

We live in evil times. I hardly need elaborate the multitude of crises that fill the globe. Sadly, many are being swept away by this flood of evil and are succumbing to an overwhelming anxiety and discouragement. But no matter how tempting it is, we must not shrink back. We must pray and fast with a living faith and a firm confidence—and there is no better way to…Continue Reading

12 Ways to Become a Committed Catholic Man

There is a Catholic “man-crisis.” Large numbers of men who were baptized Catholic have left the Church and the majority of those who remain are “Casual Catholic Men”, men who do not know the Catholic faith and don’t practice it. This large-scale failure of Catholic men to commit themselves to Jesus Christ and His Church has contributed to the accelerating…Continue Reading

Today . . .

Pope At Santa Marta: Judge Not

pope730

(Vatican Radio) It is easy to judge others, but we can only progress on our Christian journey in life if we are capable of judging ourselves first, said Pope Francis at Monday morning Mass in Casa Santa Marta. The readings of the day focused on the subject of mercy. The Pope, recalling that “we are all sinners” – not “in theory” but in reality – said that the ability to judge oneself is “a Christian…Continue Reading

Pope Angelus: Prayers for Syria, Iraq and Venezuela

pope276

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis following the recitation of the Marian Prayer on Sunday remembered the people of Syria and Iraq saying “Unfortunately, there is no cessation in the dramatic news about violence, kidnapping and harassment against Christians reaching us from Syria and Iraq. The Pope went on to say that those facing these situations were not forgotten and prayed that the intolerable brutality of which they are victims would soon be at an end.  …Continue Reading

Pope Francis at the close of the Spiritual Exercises – With a piece of Elijah’s mantle

2015-02-27 L’Osservatore Romano The meditations this morning, Friday 27 February, in Ariccia were the last of the Spiritual Exercises in which the Pontiff and members of the Roman Curia participated. Meditations were led by Carmelite, Fr Bruno Secondin, in the chapel of the House of Divin Maesto belonging to the Pauline Fathers. At the end of his reflection Friday morning, Pope Francis wanted to thank the preacher. “On behalf of everyone, myself included,” the Pope…Continue Reading

Pope Francis returns to Vatican after Lenten retreat

(Vatican Radio)  Pope Francis and members of the Roman Curia have returned to the Vatican at the conclusion of their  5-day Lenten retreat held in the town of Ariccia near Rome. The spiritual exercises began last Sunday (February 22nd) and took place in the Casa Divin Maestro centre in Ariccia. In brief remarks at the conclusion of the retreat the Pope thanked Carmelite Father Bruno Secondin for leading the spiritual exercises with them. Please find…Continue Reading

Virginia Parish Calls On Catholics . . . Join In An “Affirmation Of Faith” To Pope Francis

By LISA BOURNE FRONT ROYAL, Va. (LifeSiteNews) — A Virginia Catholic parish is publicly affirming Church teaching on marriage and its fidelity to the Church, while at the same time calling on Pope Francis to proclaim and defend the same. In the wake of the October Extraordinary Synod on the Family in Rome, St. John…Continue Reading

Egalitarian Chess

By DONALD DeMARCO A high school principal, let us imagine, who is thoroughly devoted to political correctness, summoned the school’s chess coach into his office. In that venue the following conversation took place. P: I think it is time to bring the game of chess into the 21st century. C: But chess is a timeless…Continue Reading

What If The Government Fears Freedom?

By ANDREW P. NAPOLITANO What if the current massive spying on Americans began with an innocent secret executive order signed by President Reagan in 1986? What if Reagan contemplated that he was only authorizing American spies to spy on foreign spies unlawfully present in the U.S.? What if Reagan knew and respected the history of…Continue Reading

Our Lady And The New Evangelization

By DONAL ANTHONY FOLEY Part 3 This article will look at the importance of the modern Marian apparitions, and particularly Fatima, and in this regard, this is what the Church, in the Catechism of the Catholic Church (n. 67) says about private revelation: “Throughout the ages, there have been so-called ‘private’ revelations, some of which…Continue Reading

Hanging Rudy Out To Dry

By PATRICK J. BUCHANAN Back in 1987, this writer was invited by friends to advise them on a press conference they had called to oppose President Reagan’s signing of an INF treaty to remove all nuclear missiles from Europe. My advice: Deplore the treaty; do not attack the president. The next day, Howard Phillips declared…Continue Reading

The Wanderer Interviews His Eminence Raymond Cardinal Burke . . .

burk10

By DON FIER Part 1 (Editor’s Note: Raymond Leo Cardinal Burke, Patron of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, who previously served as Prefect of the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura in Rome from June 2008 until November 2014, recently visited the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe in La Crosse, Wis. Prior to that he served as Archbishop…Continue Reading

Advertisement

Our Catholic Faith (Section B of print edition)

A Leaven In The World… Root Of Faith Crisis In Rupture Between Life And Love

By FR. KEVIN M. CUSICK Quite a few years ago, I went hiking in the Alps on the border between Italy and France with a group of reformed drug addicts and their family members. One father brought his two sons who observed my delight as I ran up to the snow line ahead of the group and collected fresh snow…Continue Reading

Are Statues Idols? The Meaning Of “False Idols”

By RAYMOND DE SOUZA, KM Part 2 “I, the Lord, am your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, that place of slavery. You shall not have other gods besides me. You shall not carve idols for yourselves in the shape of anything in the sky above or on the earth below or in the waters beneath…Continue Reading

Catechesis In The Twenty-First Century

By Don Fier “In order to arrive at a systematic knowledge of the content of the faith, all can find in the Catechism of the Catholic Church a precious and indispensable tool. It is one of the most important fruits of the Second Vatican Council.” With these words in his apostolic letter Porta Fidei announcing the upcoming Year of Faith…Continue Reading

Catholic Replies

Q. As a longtime subscriber to The Wanderer, I am puzzled that your writers don’t hesitate to criticize and disagree with bishops and cardinals on particular issues, but when it comes to the Pope you automatically close shop, yet he is human just like the bishops and cardinals. There is no teaching in our Church that says one cannot disagree…Continue Reading

God’s “Foolishness” Is Wisdom

By FR. ROBERT ALTIER Sunday Sermon for March 8, 2015 Third Sunday Of Lent (YR B) Readings: Exodus 20:1-17 1 Cor. 1:22-25 John 2:13-25 In the Gospel reading today, we hear about our Lord cleansing the Temple because the people had turned God’s house into a marketplace. The people, naturally, were appalled at this action because the buying and selling…Continue Reading

Catholic Heroes . . . St. Augustus Chapdelaine

By CAROLE BRESLIN Christianity has never been warmly welcomed by the authorities in China, but that did not stop the missionaries over the centuries who have gone there to save souls. Christianity has existed in various forms since the Tang Dynasty (eighth century). The first reports of Catholic priests going to China go back to the 13th century. John of…Continue Reading

Catholic Heroes . . . Blessed Jacinta Marto

By CAROLE BRESLIN In the Catholic classic Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis, we learn that wisdom is to be valued much more than knowledge. There is an entire book of the Old Testament called the Book of Wisdom. While holiness does not equal happiness, we can be sure that joy comes only from God. Little Jacinta Marto, the…Continue Reading