Wednesday 18th July 2018

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Sheep Without A Shepherd

July 17, 2018 Our Catholic Faith Comments Off on Sheep Without A Shepherd

By FR. ROBERT ALTIER Sixteenth Sunday In Ordinary Time (YR B) Readings: Jer. 23:1-6 Eph. 2:13-18 Mark 6:30-34 In the first reading today, God speaks a word of woe through the Prophet Jeremiah to the shepherds who mislead the Lord’s flock entrusted to their care. God says that these shepherds scattered the flock and drove them away and did not care for the flock. If we compare this to the condemnation of the wicked shepherds in Ezekiel, we can say these shepherds were selfish, caring for themselves and not for the sheep. It is amazing that things have not changed over 2,500 years of history. We are still plagued with shepherds who care more for themselves than for the flock.…Continue Reading

A Leaven In The World . . . In Death The Church Gives Everything

July 16, 2018 Our Catholic Faith Comments Off on A Leaven In The World . . . In Death The Church Gives Everything

By FR. KEVIN M. CUSICK Funerals, as many priests have learned, can often be pastorally challenging and problematic episodes. Grieving family members who are not dealing with death on a regular basis by practicing their faith are suddenly confronted with its reality upon the passing of a parent or other family member. Parents who have to bury a child sometimes cease to practice their faith entirely in the aftermath, so shocking is it to deal with the death of someone they presumed would outlive them. Grief mingles with survivor’s guilt and other reactions to create a volatile mix of emotions. Spiritual problems manifest themselves through various ways of acting out. Anger is always a possibility in such spiritually charged situations.…Continue Reading

Martin Luther… The Man And The Myth

July 15, 2018 Our Catholic Faith Comments Off on Martin Luther… The Man And The Myth

By RAYMOND DE SOUZA, KM Part 2 (Editor’s Note: As this October marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s nailing his 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Raymond de Souza is taking a break from his usual apologetics to correct the popular image of Luther.) + + + In the last article, I quoted from the excellent work about Martin Luther by the renowned author Frantz Funck-Brentano, a respected historian of the French Academy who, in spite of being a Protestant, was not afraid to unveil the truth about Luther. The fact is that Luther was a blasphemer. Let us go directly to the point: “Christ,” said Luther, “committed adultery for the first time with…Continue Reading

The Anatomy Of A Moral Act

July 14, 2018 Our Catholic Faith Comments Off on The Anatomy Of A Moral Act

By DON FIER Last week, as we considered the role that human freedom plays in the economy of salvation, it was immediately acknowledged that “man’s freedom is limited and fallible” (Catechism of the Catholic Church [CCC], n. 1739). Free will, so wondrously bestowed upon man as an essential element of his great dignity of being created “in the image and likeness of God” (cf. Gen. 1:26-27), gives him the capacity to refuse God’s salvific plan of love. As expressed by the servant of God, Fr. John A. Hardon, SJ, man was given the ability to freely “choose what is contrary to the will of God, even though he has no right to do so. He can deceive himself and become…Continue Reading

Catholic Replies

July 13, 2018 Our Catholic Faith Comments Off on Catholic Replies

Q. What can one say to a teenage daughter or granddaughter who wears skimpy bathing suits? I know that is the “style” these days, but it seems wrong for many reasons. — M.M., Virginia. A. When our five daughters were teens, my wife and I ruled out the wearing of skimpy bathing suits, as well as skin-tight jeans or shorts or revealing tops. We gave our girls certain rules and the reasons for them. One, we said that such outfits were immodest in that they made parts of the female body public that ought to be kept private, and they could be an occasion of sin for others. When presenting this argument to a Confirmation class a few years ago,…Continue Reading

The Fourth Prophecy Of Humanae Vitae… When Self-Mastery Is Rejected

July 11, 2018 Our Catholic Faith Comments Off on The Fourth Prophecy Of Humanae Vitae… When Self-Mastery Is Rejected

By FR. SHENAN BOQUET (Editor’s Note: Human Life International, which Fr. Shenan Boquet heads, first published this commentary on Humanae Vitae and LifeSiteNews reprinted it on July 2. Visit hli.org to read Fr. Boquet’s full series.) + + + “Birth Control is a name given to a succession of different expedients by which it is possible to filch the pleasure belonging to a natural process while violently and unnaturally thwarting the process itself” — G.K. Chesterton. “Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.” This is one of the most famous lines from the blockbuster movie Jurassic Park. It’s spoken by Dr. Ian Malcolm, played brilliantly by Jeff Goldblum.…Continue Reading

Have Trust And Confidence

July 10, 2018 Our Catholic Faith Comments Off on Have Trust And Confidence

By FR. ROBERT ALTIER Fifteenth Sunday In Ordinary Time (YR B) Readings: Amos 7:12-15 Eph. 1:3-14 Mark 6:7-13 In the Gospel reading today, we hear about our Lord sending out His apostles and instructing them to take nothing with them on their journey: no food, no money, no sack; just a walking stick. This requires a great amount of trust. We might say if we were sent out by Jesus Himself to do something, trust would be no problem. There are two points to understand about this: First, the apostles had not been with Him very long and did not yet have full faith in our Lord. Second, regarding ourselves, we have the Scriptures, the teachings of the Church, the…Continue Reading

A Leaven In The World “No Catholics Need Apply”

July 9, 2018 Our Catholic Faith Comments Off on A Leaven In The World “No Catholics Need Apply”

By FR. KEVIN M. CUSICK Amy Coney Barrett — a practicing Catholic and a member of a charismatic group recognized by the Church called “People of Praise” — has ascended through the Seventh Circuit to consideration as a candidate to replace Anthony Kennedy on the U.S. Supreme Court. This has brought out the latent anti-Catholicism in our society. What once was disguised as anti-immigrant sentiment, expressed through signs that greeted newcomers to this land in stores and factories, “No Irish Need Apply,” is now openly brandished. Time has made clear that what in fact was distasteful more than their Irish blood was the “strange creed” they professed, demanding fidelity to a Bishop in Rome. The Catholic Church now stands nearly…Continue Reading

Martin Luther . . . The Man And The Myth

July 8, 2018 Our Catholic Faith Comments Off on Martin Luther . . . The Man And The Myth

By RAYMOND DE SOUZA, KM Part 1 (Editor’s Note: As this October marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s nailing his 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Raymond de Souza is taking a break from his usual apologetics to correct the popular image of Luther.) + + + Why was a statue of Martin Luther erected — of all places — in the Vatican last year? It was to participate in the commemorations of a historic event: 500 years of the Lutheran “Reformation.” This year, Lutherans and Protestants of all denominations celebrate in Germany and elsewhere the historical beginning of their various churches. But why the Vatican should commemorate that man’s revolt against the Catholic…Continue Reading

Human Freedom In The Economy Of Salvation

July 7, 2018 Our Catholic Faith Comments Off on Human Freedom In The Economy Of Salvation

By DON FIER In last week’s reflection on the relationship between human freedom and responsibility, it was established that “freedom makes people responsible for their actions to the extent that they are voluntary” (Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, n. 364). Implied by this statement is that “not all human actions are equally imputable,” explains Fr. John A. Hardon, SJ. “The two foci around which imputability revolves are knowledge and freedom; when both faculties are fully operative, the responsibility is complete, but when either is somehow inhibited, the resulting imputability is lessened” (The Catholic Catechism [TCC], p. 285). The Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC) lists several factors that can diminish or nullify responsibility for an action: “ignorance,…Continue Reading